Ford Small Block V8 Racing Engines 1962 to 1970

The Essential Source Book

Ford Small Block V8 Racing Engines 1962 to 1970
$39.95 $31.96
Author:
Format: Paperback / softback, 112 Pages
ISBN: 9781845844257
Buy from an Online Retailer
US:
            
CA:
      
AU:
   

Description

This is the story of the Ford small block Fairlane V8 engine's rapid evolution from passenger car engine to highly successful racing engine and the victories it fueled for years afterwards. Initially, in May 1960, a team of nine engineers, lead by George Stirrat, designed a lightweight, all cast-iron, compact, reliable and durable power-plant for passenger cars, but following its introduction in July 1961, Ford's engineers quickly realized its potential benefits if modified for racing applications. Within three months, the capacity had been increased from 221ci to 260ci, and by early 1962 Carroll Shelby had fitted a High Performance 260ci version in his AC Cobra. Subsequently, the original design team began work on a second capacity increase, to achieve a High Performance 289ci unit; within three months the standard 289ci became available. Carroll Shelby went on to win the 1965 World Sports Car Championship using a HP-289ci. Aluminium block and cylinder head pushrod versions, designed in late 1962, had been constructed by early 1963, in preparation for that year's Indianapolis 500, and the DOHC four-valve per cylinder 255ci raced in the 1964 and 1965 Indy 500, winning the latter outright. The 302ci replaced the 289ci for the 1968 car model year and, at Le Mans in 1968 and 1969, GT40 cars won outright using this variant of the small block. In 1965, 1966 and 1967, HP-289ci-powered Mustangs won the SCCA B-Production Championship and 1966 and 1967 Trans-Am Championships. A Bud Moore Engineering Boss 302 Mustang won the 1970 Trans-Am Championship. Ford invested much time and expertise into its racing activities in the 1960s, and there's little doubt that the V8 Small Block engines took the company to the forefront of the racing world, until it withdrew from the sport in 1970.

The author

Hailing originally from New Zealand, Des Hammill is a professional engineer with many years of practical experience of building race-winning engines and solving technical problems. The author of several books in the SpeedPro series, Des writes in an easy to understand manner and gives step-by-step guidance. Des also takes his own photographs and creates his own line drawings.

Reader reviews

Specs

Format: Paperback / softback, 112 Pages
ISBN: 9781845844257
Illustrations: 125 b-w photos
Size: 8.15 in x 9.84 in x 0.325 in / 207.01 mm x 249.94 mm x 8.255 mm
Published:

You might also be interested in

Triumph Motorcycles: How the West was Won
Nearly every motorcycle nut knows that Triumphs are the most famous bikes to ever come out of Great Britain. However, they also have an extensive history in North America and have been part of that continent’s motorcycling soul since long before World War II. From Triumph Motorcycles in America is an interesting tale of how the first Triumph ...
Read More >
Valentino Rossi Through the Years
In his home country of Italy Valentino Rossi is treated like a rock star. In the MotoGP record books, he goes down as one of the greatest motorcycle road racers of all-time. Amongst all of that is a colorful life filled with all sorts of racing machinery, rivalries, victories, as well as some lean times ...
Read More >
1912 Bugatti 5-Liter
In the early days of auto making, more powerful cars usually meant considerably more weight. From his base in Molsheim, France, Ettore Bugatti set out to make a trimmed-down performance car to stop the trend. To prove his point, the car was let loose on the race track where it fulfilled its destiny as a winner. ...
Read More >
See More Posts