Wagoneer, Gladiator, Comanche, and Scrambler

An Illustrated History of Jeep's Tough, Go-Anywhere Vehicles

Wagoneer, Gladiator, Comanche, and Scrambler
$36.95
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Format: Paperback / softback, 126 Pages
ISBN: 9781583883617
Publisher: Enthusiast Books
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Description

As Jeep sales have skyrocketed in recent years, the company has put more money and muscle behind vintage names like Wagoneer and Gladiator, and has jumped into pickups as never before. But what made their past vehicles good enough to bring their names back now?

The Wagoneer and its companion, the Gladiator pickup, were well ahead of their time in technology, the first 4x4s with an independent front suspension and automatic transmission. Updates through the years kept them at the forefront of 4x4 technology, but their tough, go-anywhere nature never changed over a long, long product run. The Wagoneer name was also attached to the revolutionary “XJ” series; more commonly associated with the original Cherokee, these tough wagons were an efficient, lightweight unibody design, but were just as capable off-road as the senior Wagoneers.

Wagoneer, Gladiator, Comanche, and Scrambler dives into what made the “XJ” and “ZJ” Wagoneers special—and how they differed from the Cherokee and Grand Cherokee. With the new Gladiator making a splash, it’s time to look back on Jeep’s pickups, not just the original Gladiator, but also one of the most innovative trucks ever made: the Comanche. It shared a great deal with the Cherokee, but clever design gave it both superior ground clearance and the lowest bed height of any comparable 4x4 pickup. The book also covers the CJ-8 Scrambler, which is possibly more popular off-road today than it was at dealerships when it was made. This book traces the history and present state of some of Jeep’s newest vehicles, including the upcoming Wagoneer and the new Gladiator, and some of its most famous and most-loved, with original and period photography; it’s a “must-have” for any Jeep enthusiast.

The author

David Zatz started writing about AMC/Jeep and Chrysler vehicles in the mid-1980s, with articles in college publications and trade magazines. In 1994, he started playing with the nascent World-Wide Web and created the site that would become allpar.com—the world’s most comprehensive source of information on Chrysler and AMC/Jeep. From 2001 on, Allpar became his full-time job, and his former career in organizational research and change took a back seat. He sold Allpar.com in 2018 to focus on other projects, including writing and teaching at Fairleigh Dickinson University. David has also written for Hemmings Daily, Quality Digest Workforce, and HRMagazine; he has written chapters for the Encyclopedia of Management and the Business Strategy Book of Readings. His first book was Unlikely Icon: Creating and Remaking the Minivan (originally dubbed Mopar Minivans). David has two children, and is married to Dr. Katherine Zatz. He still maintains the acarplace.com web site and his personal site, dave.zatz.us.

Reader reviews

Specs

Format: Paperback / softback, 126 Pages
ISBN: 9781583883617
Illustrations: 160 color & b-w photos
Size: 8.5 in x 11 in / 215.9 mm x 279.4 mm
Published:

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