The Lost City of Stoke-on-Trent

The  Lost City of Stoke-on-Trent
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Format: Hardback, 152 Pages
ISBN: 9780711231399
Publisher: Frances Lincoln
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Description

This is a song for Stoke: a fanfare for one of the great cities of the world's first industrial revolution; a lament for the bottle kilns and pot banks, the terraces and mansions that were thrown up or carefully planned to house a global industry and then torn down in the 1960s; and the ballad of a remarkable city - how she was born, how she grew and behaved as a big, bold grown up and how she crumbled as she grew old but, surprisingly, never died. This is not a guide book but an invitation to explore and discover a (deeply flawed) treasure trove



Matthew Rice's detailed - and often funny - architectural watercolours are the basis of this book, but those bones are fleshed out with a narrative of the place: the towering figures of the eighteenth century, Wedgwood, Spode and Brindley; the geological underpinning of coal and clay that fixed its position; the trade with America with cargos mapping the great marches west across the prairies of the New World; the reports of unspeakable humanitarian horrors that sent a thrilling shudder through the drawing rooms of Victorian Britain and the changes those reports brought about; and the sad decline and mismanagements that all but destroyed the city after the second World War. The foreword is written by Matthew's wife Emma Bridgewater, whose first visit to Stoke twenty five years ago inspired her to start a business that still employs over one hundred people in a Victorian factory in the heart of the city.

The author

From humble beginnings, working a kiln set up in the bathroom of a squat she was living in, Emma Bridgewater has built up her eponymous pottery design business over the last twenty five years to a turnover of £ 8m. All of her ceramics are made in a nineteenth century factory on the Caldon canal in Stoke on Trent. She is married to Mathew Rice, and they collaborate on pottery designs. Emma and Matthew live in Oxford, but retain a home in Norfolk.

Matthew Rice is a painter, designer and writer. He is the author of Village Buildings of Britain (Little Brown), to which Prince Charles contributed a foreword. He lives in Norfolk with his wife, the potter Emma Bridgewater.

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Specs

Format: Hardback, 152 Pages
ISBN: 9780711231399
Illustrations: over 200 watercolour illustrations
Size: 8.465 in x 10.433 in / 215 mm x 265 mm
Published:

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